Suction-assisted lipectomy is normally safe, as long as patients are carefully selected, the operating facility is properly equipped, and the physician is adequately trained in body contouring as well as general surgery.

Nevertheless, in rare instances, the procedure may cause severe trauma, particularly when multiple or very extensive areas are suctioned at one time. Other infrequent, but possible, complications include fluid accumulation (which must be drained) and injury to the skin. Although serious complications are infrequent, infection or excessive fluid loss can lead to severe illness. You can reduce your risks by choosing a qualified plastic surgeon who has been granted privileges to perform liposuction at an accredited hospital, and by closely following his or her advice.

The scars from liposuction are small and strategically placed to be hidden from view, even in a bikini. However, other cosmetic problems may occur, even if your surgeon is very skilled. They may include rippling or bagginess of the skin over the treated area, and pigmentation changes (such as brown spots) that may become permanent if exposed to the sun. Asymmetry (uneven contour or shape) sometimes requires a second procedure.

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Planning your surgery

In your initial consultation, the surgeon will evaluate your health, determine where your fat deposits lie, and carefully assess your skin tone. Your doctor should explain any alternative body-contouring methods that may be appropriate-such as abdominoplasty, or tummy tuck-and discuss the options or the combination of procedures that would be best for you.

Be frank in discussing your expectations with your surgeon. He or she should be equally frank with you, describing the procedure in detail and explaining its risks and limitations. Your surgeon should also explain the anesthesia he or she will use, the type of facility where the surgery will be performed, and the costs involved.

During this consultation, be sure to tell your surgeon about any large weight losses or gains you’ve had at any time. You should also inform your surgeon if you smoke, and if you’re taking any medications, vitamins, or other drugs.

Don’t hesitate to ask your doctor any questions you may have, especially those regarding your expectations and concerns about the results.

Preparing for your surgery

If you’re having extensive liposuction, discuss the possibility of having blood drawn ahead of time with your doctor. Your own blood can be used to help replace the blood and other fluids you’ll lose during surgery if your doctor feels this is necessary.

Your surgeon will give you specific instructions on how to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding vitamins, iron tablets, and certain medications. If you develop a cold or an infection of any kind, especially a skin infection, your procedure will have to be postponed.

While you’re making preparations, be sure to arrange for someone to drive you home after your surgery and, if needed, to help you out for a day or two. For any Medspa agency inquiries, contact Medspa agency